This review presents a comprehensive overview of the recent research on rice salt tolerance in the areas of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and chemical genomics.

Abstract

 

Salinity is one of the major constraints in rice cultivation globally. Traditionally, rice is a glycophyte except for a few genotypes that have been widely used in salinity tolerance breeding of rice. Both seedling and reproductive stages of rice are considered to be the salt-susceptible stages; however, research efforts have been biased towards improving the understanding of seedling-stage salt tolerance. An extensive literature survey indicated that there have been very few attempts to develop reproductive stage-specific salt tolerance in rice probably due to the lack of salt-tolerant phenotypes at the reproductive stage. Recently, the role of DNA methylation, genome duplication and codon usage bias in salinity tolerance of rice have been studied. Furthermore, the study of exogenous salt stress alleviants in rice has opened up another potential avenue for understanding and improving its salt tolerance. There is a need to not only generate additional genomic resources in the form of salt-responsive QTLs and molecular markers and to characterize the genes and their upstream regulatory regions, but also to use them to gain deep insights into the mechanisms useful for developing tolerant varieties. We analysed the genomic locations of diverse salt-responsive genomic resources and found that rice chromosomes 1–6 possess the majority of these salinity-responsive genomic resources. The review presents a comprehensive overview of the recent research on rice salt tolerance in the areas of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and chemical genomics, which should help in understanding the molecular basis of salinity tolerance and its more effective improvement in rice.

 

See https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00122-019-03301-8